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Thank you for your enquiry with StoneMaster, Australia's leading stone care specialist.
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In the meantime, please feel free to contact us on 0478 085 801 or send us an email to enquiries@tilecleaners.com.au

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outdoor limestone pavers Grey limestone flooring
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How to Measure Size in m2:

It is simple to calculate the square metre size of an area.

When measuring rectangular shaped areas. Just multiply the length by the width in metres and you have the answer.

When measuring more complex shapes it is best to divide them into separate rectangles and then add them together to get a total area.

Finishes Available for Limestone

While marbles and granites are often ground and polished to a high gloss, many types of limestone are too soft for this process. In most cases limestone will be honed or will be ground to a flat or matte finish. Honed limestone has an almost chalky appearance to it, with little to no sheen.

There are a however several other limestone finishes available. The processes and finishing applied can mean that a completely different look and effect can be achieved.

Different finishes are better suited to certain environments, situations and tastes. Sawn

A comparatively rough surface. The natural stone is sawn and without any other processes such as honing, tumbling or flaming, the saw marks are likely to be visible.

Polished

A smooth and reflective surface which brings out the full colour and character of the limestone. Less slip resistant and generally reserved for indoor areas such as hotel receptions, table-tops etc. Increasingly finer abrasives are used after the honing stage and the stone is buffed to a high gloss.

  garage limestone floor polishing and sealing

Antiqued/Tumbled

Tumbling is a common technique that involves distressing the edges and surface of the stone by vibrating the stone in a bath of sand and grit (and sometimes acid). The result is a finish that looks aged and worn.

Honed

This method is a much less aggressive approach than grinding although similar. The stone is ground and sanded using coarse grit abrasives to create a smooth but satin, non-reflective finish. A satin smooth surface with little or no gloss.

Ground

A very aggressive approach to refinishing stone. It uses a metal-bonded and diamond grit heavy weighted floor buffer to remove deep scratches and lippage. The goal of this method is to flatten the floor and smooth out imperfections (as with honing). Often followed by honing and polishing.

Brushed

Steel or hard nylon brushes are used along with water to brush and wear out softer parts of the stone and create a textured finish. Provides an antique look to the stone.

Sandblasted

A textured surface is created as sand is blasted at high pressure. Shot-blasting is a similar process. The process stone often lightens the stone as well as masking the character by hiding the veins and fossils within the stone.

  luxury seal limestone tiles
Bush-Hammered

A high anti-slip finish can be created using this technique where a bush hammer is applied by machine or hand at high impact to pit the surface of the stone, as per the example on the Asian Blue Limestone above.

Chiselled

Lines are mechanically chiselled into the stone to create an anti-slip finish.

StoneMaster has the expertise and ability to resurface your limestone, to remove scratches and etches and create the look you want.

In most situations with normal wear on natural stone, a simple polish will restore the sheen.

In cases with heavy wear and etches, StoneMaster can resurface the area and remove all scratches and etches and then polish with a polishing compound to restore the original finish.

  grey limestone after sealing
QUICK ENQUIRY FORM

How to Measure Size in m2:

It is simple to calculate the square metre size of an area.

When measuring rectangular shaped areas. Just multiply the length by the width in metres and you have the answer.

When measuring more complex shapes it is best to divide them into separate rectangles and then add them together to get a total area.


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